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  • 1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification

    Page 1 of 5 part 1

    Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable.

    Regards,

    Archiver



    04-08-2012 #1
    NWVintage


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    1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification

    Ok, so I finally got started on the new boat yesterday. Well, I guess I'd done some minor preliminary steps but I finally started really digging in.

    This is a 1978 19'6" hardtop cuddy with a Merc 470, Alpha-one Outdrive and a 199x Merc 15hp kicker. It is in good overall shape and appears to have been well cared for until the most recent owner left it out, uncovered for the last [he say] two years - based on the tabs on both the trailer and the boat, its been more like three to three and a half...

    I have not had it in the water yet but I tested everything that you can test on land. The previous owner also had a preseason tune-up done and had the motors generally looked over by a mechanic (whom I trust). I also got a pretty smoking deal on it (traded it for a car that I couldn't seem to sell which blue-booked for $4500 but no one wanted to pay more that $3500 for).

    So, introduction aside, she's in good working order but filthy. Yesterday, I got some cleaning done. I had previously covered her with a tarp, removed all of the wooden vinyl-covered wooden panels along the gunwales and placed a fan in there to dry everything out.

    During the tear-down process, I also discovered some PNW damp-wood termites in the panels on the port side, so I doused those panels and everything in the general vicinity with termite killer as well as did some research. This breed of termites are apparently quite common in this part of the country - I had always thought that we didn't have termites in the PNW - but you don't hear much about them because they live only in damp wood. It seems that they require a water source in their food, so they will not eat your house unless you have flaked-off paint or a leaky roof. They are found mostly in decomposing wood - stumps, branches, etc. Therefore, so long as you keep the wood from getting wet, you're good to go...

    Now, for the work I did yesterday. To start, I took literally everything off of the boat; including all of the wooden pieces that I had previously removed as well as the foot boxes, captain's chair and padding out of the cuddy. I laid that all out on my patio, scrubbed it and let it dry in that beautiful sun that we had. Then I moved back on to the boat and scrubbed everything - walls, cuddy, floor, what I could get to of the engine and fuel tank areas, etc. She looked pretty good once all of the dirt was gone. I was able to get most of the crap out of the bilge too!

    And now, for the bad... As I was finishing up and thinking through what my plan for the deck was going to be - the vinyl is pretty trashed astern - I noticed so cracked gel-coat in the section of floor to port of the engine. As is often my wont, I decided to dig deeper... I pulled up some of the glass and found that the cracking was directly above the hole in the floor where the foam was injected into the port cavity. The foam right there is quite soggy - when pressed with my finger, water squished out. I pounded around the area a bit with a hammer to try to discern how wide-spread the damaged wood is and it appears to be only about a 8x10" area.

    So, question... Does the foam act like a sponge, wicking the water throughout, or is there a possibility that I may be able to cut a slightly larger hole to dry it out and then seal it back up? I guess I'm just wondering if I have to just band-aid it for the season and then replace the whole floor/foam or if there's a possibility that I can clean up the mess and move on.

    Below are some images of both the fun parts and the not-so-fun part... What do you all think?

    Attached Images Attached Images
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    1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

    1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)




    04-09-2012 #2
    Billy 4 hp

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    The foam basically acts like a sponge and is hard to dry out.... IMHO the best option to figure out how "wet" the foam is would be to take the boat/trailer down and get it weighed on a commericial scale and compare that overall weight (minus trailer weight) to the numbers found in the 1976 brochure available from this site. (Drain the fuel tanks, etc before weighing)... If the weight does not deviate much, your boat isn't all that water logged and go out and have some fun....

    Other options would be to cut some exploratory holes with a hole saw and do some sample test, pull the fuel tank(s) out, etc.... You just need to decide if what your goals are. A boat for this season, or a project...

    Again JMHO....

    1973 21' Glasply Express
    302 Mercruiser fresh water cooled
    Complete SEI 106 outdrive
    JRC 1000 Radar
    Color Matched Sport Yak II Dinghy
    aka Mean Green





    04-09-2012 #3
    sparkotic

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    Unless it is COMPLETLY water logged, I would enjoy your new toy for the season. take notes during the season that you would like fixed/changed and do the project during the winter.

    calm seas and tight lines.





    04-09-2012 #4
    NWVintage

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    Thanks for the quick responses guys. I think that I will poke around a little more to get a better idea of what I have. ie., see if there seems to have been water getting in anywhere else. If not, I'll probably just seal it up and go crazy on it next winter. My biggest fear is that I'll get it in the water and it will have a mean list to port... Like I said, water squishes out of the foam when I press it with my finger, so I have a sinking suspicion that it's pretty water logged, even though wood seems to only be soggy close to the entry site.

    1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

    1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





    04-09-2012 #5
    Binford

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    x2 on the exploratory hole-drilling. Drill a few more holes up the floor every couple feet or so to see how extensive the water intrusion appears to be. Worst-case is you have to pull the floor up and do the messy job of removing all that water-logged foam. It's all flat so it would be a fairly simple matter of laying down new plywood and glassing it back in. But I'd drill a few holes and see what you have. If it's not very extensive, the holes would be a snap to fill back in.

    -- Tim Taylor

    1980 Glasply 19-1/2' cuddy hardtop w/Mercruiser 470 (x2)





    04-09-2012 #6
    willburrrr2003

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    You have a good start on your boat, nice job finding the squishy soaked foam. Can you let it air and dry in the foam some before you fill it back in?

    Regards,

    Will





    04-10-2012 #7
    NWVintage

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    Quote Originally Posted by willburrrr2003 View Post
    Can you let it air and dry in the foam some before you fill it back in?
    That's what I'm hoping. I'm going to follow the advice of the others/my initial inclination and explore some more. If it doesn't seem to extend very far from that hole, I'm thinking that I'll cut out the soggy wood (about 8"x10"), let it dry as much as possible and then patch the floor. I'm thinking that some stainless or galvanized bar stock bolted through the underside of the floor to support the little piece of marine plywood with some fiberglass filler in the cracks, a couple layers of resin and a layer of mat over top - cut the hole in the existing fiberglass an inch or two larger than the hole in the wood so that the new mat lays across the cracks. Then new deck paint on the whole thing - I was thinking new vinyl but I don't like how it traps water underneath when it's not fully adhered to the floor.

    But that's only if the damage isn't extensive. If that's the case, fill the holes and worry about it in the winter (assuming that there isn't an extreme list when I get it in the water). Fingers crossed...

    What do you all think about deck paints and the whole sealing metal into the floor idea?

    1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

    1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)

  • #2
    Page 1 of 5 part 2

    Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable.

    Regards,

    Archiver



    04-10-2012 #8
    sparkotic

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    I just painted my deck with west marine evercoat non skid. Only time will tell how long it holds up. I do wish I had done a little better prep work before applying... I hope it doesn't bite me later. sure looks and feels good now though.

    calm seas and tight lines.


    04-11-2012 #9
    NWVintage

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkotic View Post
    I just painted my deck with west marine evercoat non skid. Only time will tell how long it holds up. I do wish I had done a little better prep work before applying... I hope it doesn't bite me later. sure looks and feels good now though.
    I just hate West Marine so much, though... I'm all about proper prep-work, so no worries there. How high up the sides did you go? I was thinking that I'd love to prep up to the gunwale and paint with a high-gloss topside paint from the gunwale down to the floor and then paint the floor with non-skid. Is there any sort of primer that you have to use for this kind of stuff or is it just a sand, clean, paint situation?

    First things first, though - I have to figure out how bad this water logging is. I may just patch it up and ignore it for a while. I'm hoping to put it in the water this weekend to see what the weight distribution is like. But that hinges on my brother getting his car out of my driveway. Besides, I need to put some finishing touches on the 17' and get it listed...

    1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

    1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





    04-11-2012 #10
    sparkotic

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    for the non-skid, there is no primer needed. just rough it up for adhesion. My plan was the same as your idea, but inside my gunnels is very pourous. I will need to lay alot more resin. I will conquer that next winter.

    calm seas and tight lines.

    Comment


    • #3
      Page 2 of 5 part 1

      Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable.

      Regards,

      Archiver

      Thread: 1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification




      04-16-2012 #11
      NWVintage

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      Alright all-

      So, I went to Seattle Marine on Saturday and bought mat, resin, deck paint, etc. to fix the holes that I drilled in my deck. On the way home, I was re-thinking the project and the fact that I had just spent $180 to cover up a problem that I would have to fix later.

      I changed my mind.

      Sunday, I cut a big hole in the middle of the port side floor to get the lay of the land. I borrowed a friend's Dremel, cut the fiberglass right around the edges and pried it up. Both sides turned out to be full of water but the wood was really only rotten at the entry point on the port side.

      So now I have the whole floor up and I bought marine grade plywood from which to cut pieces and some laminating resin to get started. Fiberlay in SODO was suggested by the guy at Seattle Marine as a good place to get bulk mat for cheap so I'll pick that up sometime soon. Tomorrow, I'll rip out the foam and clean up my cuts/prep.

      The way that I cut the glass along the edges allowed me to leave the one piece of floor directly adjacent to the bulkhead intact and will allow me to lay the new floor right up next to the existing piece and not remove the bulkhead.

      The plan is to clean everything out of there, cut some wood to fit, check it for fit, take it back out, bed it with resin, install the floor, cut mat to fit, resin, lay mat, resin, resin, paint.

      I plan to paint all the way up into the gunwales. The guy I talked to at Seattle Marine suggested that I use a two-part enamel and mix in sand for the non-skid. That way I get a gloss on the walls, non-kid on the floor and no line between. It goes like this: mix a first coat for the whole thing, paint first coat, wait..., mix enough for whole second coat, paint walls, mix in sand, paint floor.

      I had to cover it up and rush off to work right when I finished removing the floor, so I'll take some photos of the work so far and post them tomorrow.

      I know this post is a bit disjointed but what do you all think. Also, who has input on foam - amount, purveyor, etc.

      1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

      1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





      04-16-2012 #12
      willburrrr2003

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      NWV,

      When I started my project, and a friend would ask how long it will take to get my boat ready for the water....my response was "As long as it takes to do it right" , I think you are proceeding down that road of thinking ! You found an issue, and are now resolving it. You get rid of the rot that's there, and the extra water weight. That makes the boat better on gas, and more solid again...ALL GOOD in my book! Can't wait to see pics of the work.


      Regards,

      Will





      04-17-2012 #13
      NWVintage

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      Quote Originally Posted by willburrrr2003 View Post
      "As long as it takes to do it right"
      Exactly.

      I think I'll have the floor in today. Then it's just foam and glass... We'll see though. The ledges that the floor sits on along the outer sides are wood and not rotten but fairly wet, so I may give them a few days to dry... Also, they appear near impossible to remove. I'll probably bed them with laminating resin for good measure too.

      Any ideas about foam?

      Pics this evening.

      1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

      1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





      04-17-2012 #14
      nova7163





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      Send a message via Yahoo to nova7163

      I didn't see you say anything about what you are going to do to the underside of the wood. I would at least coat it with some resin thinned with styrene. That will keep it from rotting out from the underside.

      1978 Glasply cuddy, D&D Marine outboard bracket, 2006 Yamaha F250
      PHOTO ALBUM........................21' BUILD THREAD........................9' GLASPLY JET DINGHY





      04-17-2012 #15
      NWVintage

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      Quote Originally Posted by nova7163 View Post
      I didn't see you say anything about what you are going to do to the underside of the wood. I would at least coat it with some resin thinned with styrene. That will keep it from rotting out from the underside.
      Thanks! I guess I didn't say it but that's why I'm taking the wood back out after I check the fit - to completely cover the entire piece in resin. Apparently, Glasply didn't think of this...

      I'd also like to meet the guy that laid the glass for the port side stringers...so I can kick him in the crotch. It's sort of shocking how much better the starboard side construction is than the port side. pics tonight...

      Lunch is over, back to work.

      1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

      1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





      04-17-2012 #16
      nova7163

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      Sounds like you got it covered. This is going to be a record floor replacement job. Look forward to seeing pictures.

      1978 Glasply cuddy, D&D Marine outboard bracket, 2006 Yamaha F250
      PHOTO ALBUM........................21' BUILD THREAD........................9' GLASPLY JET DINGHY





      04-17-2012 #17
      SteveP

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      I just re-did my deck for the same reasons as you... Wet foam under the deck and both sides were waterlogged. For the non-skid, I used Durabek in white. It is a pretty high textured non-skid and it took 2 gallons for the whole deck and up underneath the gunnels. It looks great right now but time will tell. All the review I read and heard of the product indicate that it will last a long time. It was about $120.00 per gallon... not inexpensive, but pretty easy to apply with the rollers they provide.

      steve

      Fishing is not a matter of life or death... it's much more important than that!!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Page 2 of 5 part 2

        Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable. I think I got the youtube link working at the end though.

        Regards,

        Archiver

        Thread: 1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification


        04-17-2012 #18
        NWVintage

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        So, I got all of the foam out today. Below are a few photos. The first is from Sunday, when I cut the initial hole, to get the lay of the land. In the writeup that SteveP did, he opted to leave a lip of old floor to support his new floor, thus raising his floor 1/2 inch. I'm not sure how he accommodated his cuddy door (Steve?...) but I wanted to have it the original height so that I could avoid removing the bulkhead by leaving some of the wood across in front of the bulkhead.

        I initially cut the 8 feet of deck from the transom to a seam that was evidenced by a ridge in the fiberglass. Being that it was exactly 8 feet from the transom, I reasoned that it would be seam. It was. Using a metal cutoff blade (as much because that's what I had as because it worked well) on a Dremel, I went all the way around the edge of the piece, cutting the fiberglass. Along the edge of the well where the gas tank is and around the engine area, you have to cut below the floor by holding the blade horizontally and cutting about 5/8" down the wall. For the most part, I was able to just pry the piece up once the cut was complete. My initial cut is the one in the second photo.

        After I got both sides of the deck out, I started removing foam. It became clear that I would have to remove more floor so that I could access all of the foam. I made a few exploratory cuts but ended up plunging the skill saw in 6 inches from the bulkhead with the guard set to about 5/8" in (1/2" plywood + 1/8" fiberglass) and finished cutting the fiberglass along sides with the Dremel. This gave me access to the remainder of the foam and should leave me enough room to overlap my new fiberglass on to the old floor. This extreme forward piece of floor was hardly even damp anyway. My plan is to cut only the fiberglass an additional 3", sand the edge to a gentle angle and overlap my new mat. I'm hoping that once I paint, you'll hardly be able to tell that I did this whole thing.

        Once I had everything out, I went around the whole thing with the Dremel one more time to get the edges nice. This time, I held the blade at about a 30 degree angle to the wall and cut off the lip that was left by my original cut - see the second photo below (original cut) versus the third photo (final cut). This should make the transition to the all from the floor nice and smooth.

        I did make some interesting and not-so-awesome discoveries in this process. First, the outer stringer on the port side does not tie into the hull toward the stern (fourth photo). The glass simply doesn't reach all the way to the hull and the foam is exposed about one inch at the bottom. Lame. Second, those holes that are plugged at the bottom of the stringers in below the engine - those go all the way through (third photo); which would be totally handy for draining water from under the floor...if it weren't for the fact that the compartment that they are able to drain extends only as far forward as the front of the engine compartment. Third, GlasPly didn't bed their wood! There's wood around the engine compartment that really ought to have had some resin on it so that it wouldn't get all soggy like it is. Same goes for the underside of the floor. Ironically, there is a small compartment under the deck between the front of the gas tank and the step down into the cuddy that has plenty of resin on the wood within - it was dry.

        The plan will be to let it dry for a few days while I get the rest of the necessary products rounded up and the deck cut and prepped. Before I reinstall the deck, I plan to glass over that "drain hole" (aka water entry point) back by the transom, finish the fiberglass on the outer port side stringer and glass over the foam injection points on the stringers. I am mostly planning to do these things to seal any moisture into the space that its already in and prevent contamination of my new stuff. I also plan to give everything under there (particularly the wood parts) a coat of laminating resin to make sure it's sealed.

        Does anyone have any questions/comments/concerns? This is really my first major boat project and any input will at least get me thinking...

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        Last edited by NWVintage; 04-18-2012 at 07:49 AM.

        1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

        1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





        04-18-2012 #19
        NWVintage

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        More photos.

        Attached Images Attached Images
        File Type: jpg IMG_0988.jpg‎ (88.3 KB, 44 views)
        File Type: jpg IMG_0981.jpg‎ (89.2 KB, 45 views)
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        File Type: jpg IMG_1002.jpg‎ (89.6 KB, 43 views)
        File Type: jpg IMG_0996.jpg‎ (90.1 KB, 45 views)

        1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

        1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





        04-18-2012 #20
        NWVintage

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        And here is a collection of the video clips that I shot yesterday. When I'm all finished, I'll put everything together into a video.



        1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

        1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)

        Comment


        • #5
          Archiver

          Page 4 of 5 part 1

          Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable.
          Regards,

          Archiver

          Thread: 1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification




          05-29-2012 #31
          NWVintage
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          Well, I wrote a detailed explanation of my reasoning but my craptacular computer wouldn't post it and I copied it but forgot to paste it and save it before restarting my computer...

          Long story short, properly poured foam is not going to allow water to travel much under the deck: if it goes through the deck, it will stay in the area where it goes through and it will certainly not drain from on top of the foam to a drain hole beneath the foam - the foam is more-or-less impermeable to water. And my gelcoat is in excellent shape, so no worries there. My plan of attack is to construct a deck that is superior to the original - which will not be difficult, mine was crap. The only way that drainage will make any difference is if you don't fill the voids with foam.

          1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

          1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





          05-29-2012 #32
          sparkotic
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          or if for some reason, like temps don't agree, or something to that nature, you don't get a good pour. Personally, I think I would still put drain holes... just incase.

          calm seas and tight lines.





          06-03-2012 #33
          NWVintage

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          Quote Originally Posted by sparkotic View Post
          or if for some reason, like temps don't agree, or something to that nature, you don't get a good pour. Personally, I think I would still put drain holes... just incase.
          Thanks again Saprkotic! Your input is awesome and making this thread much better for future readers - so that they think about all of the angles. I appreciate your input and expertise. I am not debating these issues with you, merely chronicling my methods and decision-making process.

          In the interest of continuing to provide information about why I'm doing the things I'm doing, I will redo my aforementioned explanation of my decision:

          When I tore out my deck and foam, I made some discoveries. Mainly, it seems that the port and starboard stringers and deck were constructed by different people with significantly different levels of know-how. They are quite simply two completely different situations. There was no water under the starboard other than a very small amount below the captain's chair mount (which had no sealant evident anywhere). The port side had a significant amount of water under it. The only evident entrance point was the aft-most foam-pour hole. The fiberglass was very cracked there. I believe that this was the only entrance point because it is the only area where the wood was significantly wet and the only place there was significant cracking. As I was removing the foam, I removed any water with a wet-vac before working on the foam. Once the water on top was removed, I found very little water within the foam and none below the foam. When it was all said and done, I only removed about 3 gallons of water from below the deck - sure there was probably some within the removed foam but I can tell you that there was very little. Now, remember that I said the port side was very poorly done? This included the foam. It was obviously done in numerous pours, improperly mixed for some of them and at a very low temperature - there were parts that were extremely airy, parts that were simply non-expanded and many different densities in between. And yet there was still no water below the foam. As I mentioned previously, there was water that drained from the drain hole in the stringer but the cavity that this hole is capable of draining was maybe half-full of foam and right next to the aforementioned cracks in the deck fiberglass. Also, the original stringer plugs were really chincy and could easily have been the entry point.

          Anyway, I have replaced the stringer plugs with superior rubber-style drain plugs (like you might use on a RIB - tighten the screw to expand the rubber...) and I will not be glassing over the holes through the stringers but I will also not be drilling additional holes, as I believe this to be a futile attempt to drain that which is not drainable. I spent almost an hour talking with someone from the company that I ordered my foam from - I am confident that I will get a good pour and that the foam will not allow drainage. I will detail my method and reasoning in a later posting about the pour but let's say it will be plenty warm for a proper reaction and my mixing will optimal.

          1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

          1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





          06-03-2012 #34
          sparkotic

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          Glad to here. It sounds like the foam you are using is a much better quality than I was thinking. I keep imaging this open cell Styrofoam type stuff, that would essentially act like a sponge. it sounds like your boat is going to be much better than originally constructed.

          something to consider, which depends on what you use your boat for, is modifications. I haven't redone my deck yet, but I do wish I would have done this mod before painting all the non-skid. I think I got the idea from JJc23, but I have seen it in a couple other Glasplys, and is common in many other boats. that is to utilize the space below the deck, in between the stringers, and make a fish box or bait tank. granted, without raising your deck, the box would only be about 4-6" deep (I think, like I said I haven't removed my deck yet), but I think that would still hold a few salmon, or rig it to hold live herring/sand dabs. or if you aren't that big into fishing, you could make this space into a cooler to hold beer or sodas and such. I think JJc23 raised his deck about 4", he covered it in his post.
          Just wanted to throw you this idea before you get to far into it. I will be doing this mod to my deck next winter I think.

          Remember to take lots of pictures and keep us updated.

          calm seas and tight lines.





          06-04-2012 #35
          Binford

          Join Date
          Jun 2011
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          Port Orchard, Wash.
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          3,115

          Quote Originally Posted by sparkotic View Post
          ...I think I got the idea from JJc23, but I have seen it in a couple other Glasplys, and is common in many other boats. that is to utilize the space below the deck, in between the stringers, and make a fish box or bait tank. granted, without raising your deck, the box would only be about 4-6" deep (I think, like I said I haven't removed my deck yet), but I think that would still hold a few salmon, or rig it to hold live herring/sand dabs. or if you aren't that big into fishing, you could make this space into a cooler to hold beer or sodas and such. I think JJc23 raised his deck about 4", he covered it in his post.
          Here's a picture of the boxes in that 19' runabout that was at the Stokes Auction in Port Orchard last month. It appears that the sole was at the original level, so I imagine your situation would be similar:

          -- Tim Taylor

          1980 Glasply 19-1/2' cuddy hardtop w/Mercruiser 470 (x2)

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          • #6
            Page 4 of 5 part 1

            Recovered thread originally posted by NWVintage on 04-08-2012. I am sorry to say that all the pics on this thread were stored on the old site and are not recoverable.
            Regards,

            Archiver

            Thread: 1978 19'6" Hardtop cuddy clean/remodel/modification



            06-04-2012 #36
            jjc23
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            May 2007
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            Bonney Lake wa
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            1,330

            I raised mine 6" from factory height and gained a box 12" deep inboard and 10" outboard about 3' long on a 21'. I still have all three stringers full length and where the boxes are the stringer is only 2", not the 8" factory height. Its been a pain in the butt and if I do it again I will do it differently but all in all im happy with it and would want it on any boat I have, just adds a fair amount of storage

            06-12-2012 #37
            NWVintage

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            Mar 2012
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            Thanks for a the great idea guys - I had considered doing just that (the boxes) but I have resolved to avoid customization on my first major boat project. Mostly because I just want to see it through from start to finish and shoot for a good product. Maybe the next boat will see more aggressive mods. Also, I have this penchant for refinishing things like they were originally but using superior methods and materials - I like to take old things that don't work and make them work and look as they originally did; heavy customization is just not my thing. Not that a livewell would constitute heavy modification, rather I'm just shooting for a better-than-original refinish.

            sparkotic- I'm using this foam http://www.uscomposites.com/foam.html in the 2lb density. SteveP used the same and reported good results http://www.glasply.net/showthread.ph...for-a-new-deck. It is a closed-cell expanding urethane foam that I will pour in much the same way that SteveP did.

            As for the actual project, I went and purchased all of my glassing materials the other day. If anyone (in WA) is going to do a project like this, I'd highly recommend visiting Fiberlay http://www.fiberlay.com/. They're in Seattle on East Marginal, on the left just before it turns into 99 - super convenient from the south end. The guy who runs the retail shop (Bill, I think...I'll get his name for sure when I'm in there next) actually did tooling for Jerry Caldwell and Glasply, which is cool, and he really know s his stuff when it comes to fiberglass and gelcoat.

            In my conversation with Bill(?) my plans changed substantially. I am using polyester resin instead of epoxy, am using mat and cloth rather than just cloth, and will be using gelcoat rather than paint.

            Essentially, polyester just seems like a better product - our boats were made with it, you can adjust cure times by adding more or less catalyst, it cures from tack to full cure much faster, and it provides a stronger finished product. I also learned that cloth will not bond to wood - you must use a chopped-strand mat between wood and cloth or there will be no bond. I'm using 3/4oz mat and 6oz cloth. Fiberlay has both in 38" or 50" wide rolls and both are $4.xx per yard.

            I have decided to use gelcoat because it is stronger, more permanent and, if you take them a sample (or the whole boat) they can use what was described to me as a "ridiculously expensive camera" to color match the existing gelcoat. I'm going to lay the gelcoat on thick. I will start by coating the whole deck and walls up to the gunwales with un-waxed gelcoat. Next, a coat of waxed will go on the walls from the deck to the gunwales; sand and buff. Then, for the non-skid, I will use fumed silica as a thickening agent in a coat of un-waxed gelcoat on the deck. This will allow me to roll-in a texture using a standard medium-nap paint roller. I'll give it a rough hand-sand to knock of the extreme peaks and the apply a coat of waxed gelcoat to finish it up. I asked about sand and was told that it is doable but literally turns out like sandpaper - no bare feet, extremely difficult to get completely clean, only recommended for hardcore fishing. I will be fishing from the boat but it will frequently be used as a pleasure boat as well, so I decided against sand.

            I will post pics and video. All I've actually done since my last update is some of the aforementioned below-deck cleanup and re-glassing. There will be photos and video of that too. Just trying to fit the actual work in before I miss too much summer...

            1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

            1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





            06-12-2012 #38
            NWVintage

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            Mar 2012
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            Oh, and in my research I discovered what seems like a great way to create the drainage that we spent so much time discussing. It's on the iboats forum. I don't know if you'll have to have a login to view this link, but here it is: http://forums.iboats.com/showthread....34392&page=167 it's post number 4158. If you have the time, scan the whole thread - pretty cool project...

            I'm still not going to bother - it's not going to get water under the deck while I own it - but I might sing a different tune if I had wood stringers...

            1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

            1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)





            06-12-2012 #39
            jjc23

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            May 2007
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            You must have been at fiberlay on friday around 1030-11? I was there too and heard you two talking about your boat floor. It is a good place lots of good people to help. If you are interested in comparison shopping try rev chem in tacoma there glass seems to be a lot cheaper then fiberlay. Also nova found a place in tacoma called spi they do foam stuff and we got our foam for about 1/2 that uscomposite sells for.

            Last edited by jjc23; 06-12-2012 at 04:48 PM.




            06-13-2012 #40
            NWVintage

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            Mar 2012
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            I was! That's kind of crazy! I already bought everything from Fiberlay, so I'll have to keep Rev Chem in mind for my next project. As for SPI, I saw nova's post about them and I tried to contact them but by the time the sales guy called me back, I had already ordered the US Composites stuff. It's crazy how much the prices for foam vary - the stuff at Fiberlay and most of the stuff that I found on the internet were double the price of US Composites!

            I also decided to go with US Composites because the FAQ on the SPI site made it sound as though their foam was not really very water resistant while US Composites made specific claims about the fact that their foam is closed cell, waterproof, and specifically designed for the use that I am planning to make of it. Compared to many of the other materials used in this project, the foam was not too bad - actually about the same as the plywood, even with the shipping and the fact that I ordered well more than I need. Really, this whole project has cost less than refurbishing the trailer...

            1978 19' Cuddy Hardtop - Merc 470 & Alpha One, 199x Merc 15hp

            1970 17' Runabout - 1963 Merc 850, 1964 Merc 39, 1965 Merc 1000 (parts/backup)

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