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Bottom Restoration, Using -Interprotect 2000E & Bottom Paint

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  • Bottom Restoration, Using -Interprotect 2000E & Bottom Paint

    Three coat of this specialized paint, designed for below the waterline, hardened with additives, commonly used for blister repair. Then a coating of anti fouling paint, that will bond with the new finish.
    Step one, float the boat and removed the trailer,
    Step two, sand the boat with 80 grit, us body filler is needed,
    Step three, mix finish, pot life will hold for three coats as long as the finish is placed in a cool place between coats. Cure time for 60 F is 3-4 hours, my middle of the day second coat took only 2 hours.
    Step four, switch to bottom paint, all application done with 9" & 4" 3/8" rollers, the 9" with 5' extension.
    Step five, put the boat back on the trailer.

    Floating the boat


    Sanded


    First coat of finish

  • #2
    Nice setup you have, I sure wish I had a way to lift my 28 for bottom paint like that. How do you like the interprotect?

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    • #3
      Whats the stern hanging from

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      • #4
        I do like Interprotect, it is different, and a bit challenging to keep it mixed up. But I like how you can mix the days worth of finish in one shot and then get each coat on from the same batch. It has heavy solids that want to settle, and you really need to put it on outside, to keep from breathing the fumes. Pretty much you handle it just like bottom paint.

        The stern is held up by the 20" I-beam required to support the second floor of the garage.

        Here are the final images:
        This one is the repaired Transom, there really wasn't any soft plywood (2" thick) but my guess is there was a void so that when the side bolt was tightened it torqued the fiberglass/plywood creating a void, an the water dripped in.




        Last edited by sgschwend; 05-17-2015, 08:11 PM.

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        • #5
          Military surplus forklift?

          I like how you did that! But why bottom paint on a trailered boat? I thought that was more for boats that are moored for lengths of time.
          -- Tim Taylor

          1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
          1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
          1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


          You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

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          • #6
            Crabbing in Oak Harbor is in the early season. The marina will let small boats stay fairly cheaply. However a month in the Oak Harbor's shallow bay would result in heavy marine growth.

            The previous owner had trouble understanding that a boat was meant to be in the water, they used it on a fresh water lake and beached it. When I saw the condition of the prop he said the beaches had a lot of rocks. The restoration finish did a good job of fixing that. I used the same bottom paint I use in my other boat, it took less than 1/2 gallon, around $40.

            Now I can install the outdrive, engine and get going on a pot puller.

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            • #7
              That looks great! Just keep it off the nice "sandy" beaches of Whidbey and you'll be fine.

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