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  • Glasply History

    In case we are unable to get the backup files, I'm trying to salvage some history from Google's cache files of the old site....

    Back on January 23, 2013, Bill V had received an email from the daughter of Ken Smith, the original founder of the company that would later on start building Glasply boats. Here is that email:


    I am the daughter of Glas-Ply's founder, Ken Smith, and have some information on the company that would be helpful and more accurate than what I have seen since the passing of Ken Hopen. Mr. Hopen was taken in as a partner around 1968 and was in charge of the office and sales. My dad designed all the boats and made the molds that are still in use, today. To my knowledge, Mr. Hopen was not involved in that process, unless it was to give an opinion. My dad sold his half of the business to Ken Hopen when my parents divorced in 1970-71. (He started up another boat plant in Hawaii in the 1970's but that is another story.)

    Glas-Ply started out in the 1950's as a pioneer in plastics in the northwest. Dad made laundry trays, chairs, and small dinghys, then progressed to larger boats. Needing more capital, Dad sold to Pacific Marine Supply and designed and managed the Pacific Mariner boat line. One of the models was used in the water ski show for the Seattle World's Fair in 1962, which was held in a giant moat at the Stadium. Schwabacher Hardware eventually bought out Pacifice Marine. Dad stayed until the plant was closed.

    After that, Dad and Orin Edson started Bayliner. But two A-type personalities did not mix well and Orin bought out Dad. The Glas-Ply name and the laundry tray business had been purchased by someone in Granite Falls area and my dad went back to the defunct business and purchased back the name and the boat plant was opened. Enter, Ken Hopen a couple of years later.

    A few years ago, my dad came out to Marysville, WA for a visit and I had noticed that Glas-Ply was in existence in a building in the Arlington Airport area. We made a visit to the company and spoke with the then owner and I am sorry I don't remember his name. I heard that the business was moved to LaConnor,WA, later. I don't know if they are still making boats and I have not yet had a chance to go through the website.

    Ken Smith died on May 30, 2010, in Vernal, Utah. He was 82. I thought about announcing it in the paper but procrastinated--I wish I had not. I just saw the write up in the Everett Herald newspaper about Ken Hopen and it is full of inaccuracies. Mr. Hopen was a great salesman and helped to grow the business. There is no doubt about that but he did not "found" the Glas-Ply company.

    I am only writing all this to set the record straight and not from anything vindictive. Dad built some beautiful boats and it is wonderful that they are still appreciated by their owners. Unfortunately, our family never did own one! But we did have the use of a couple during some memorable family times.

    I look forward to going through the website and hope that this information is helpful to those who need the background on the company. If you need any more verification, I still can find a few employees that worked for my dad plus some pictures of the early days.

    Thanks for "listening".

    With regards,

    Katherine Smith Alderman
    -- Tim Taylor

    1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
    1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
    1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


    The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

  • #2
    On January 28, 2013, Bill V posted another e-mail from Mrs. Alderman:


    This is from an email I received from Katherine Smith Alderman and the attachment was a pdf that showed a handout for Glasply car top boats and from the Mercury outboard used it appears to be late 50's as she states. Enjoy. Once I figure out how to display it on the forum I'll post it.


    Hello, Bill.

    Attached is the only flyer that I can find from the early days, circa late 50's. My dad, Ken Smith is facing out and the fellow at the tiller is an employee, Bill Mathiason. As you can see there were three sizes of Car Top Boats available.
    If this doesn't open, please let me know. I can also send or fax you a copy.

    My brother Steve Smith was by today and corrected me on the Orin Edson connection which I would like you to share with the group. After Pacific Mariner sold to Reinell, Dad was not pleased with the owner for some reason. Orin Edson was with or owned--I don't know which--Advanced Outboard Marine and contracted with Dad to make boats for him. Dad had to design and make all new molds. My brother said that he did not just take a mold off of another boat he had already made. There was a two-year contract and the boats were named Bayliner and Orin owned the name. After the two years, Dad severed the relationship and then went on to buy back the GlasPly name and open the plant. Once again, having to make all new molds. So, my apology for that misinformation. I was in high school and college at the time and like any teenager, heard bits and pieces and put them together wrong. Steve was still at home and worked for Dad after school.

    As to the question of the 28 foot boat built in La Conner: Dad and Les Baumgard designed and made the mold for that. My brother and the secretary, Jane Wagner, confirmed that.

    I won't post any more history until I can get some more information. I have contacted a few of the employees who are still living and hope to have them send me some stories, photos or whatever. I have located a lot of brochures on Pacific Mariner on the website. I am going to contact Mercury Outboard to see if they can give me a copy of the advertisement that was in Tommy Bartlett's water ski show at the Seattle World's Fair. I can find the program online but it is not available for copying on the site.

    Now that I have begun this journey, I can see it is going to take a lot of "digging". For some reason our family did not think to document the business. And at that time I was pretty young and that is what my dad did--built boats. I anyone has a photo, brochure, etc., I would appreciate a copy. I would like to do a complete write-up. Maybe a small book?

    Thanks for everything.

    Katherine Alderman



    Later that day, Bill V posted this:


    Another email I received today:

    Hi Bill.

    Yes, you can post the flyer. Someone on the forum wanted to know who designed the 28 footer and Dad and Les Baunsgard did, according to my brother Steve Smith and Jane Wagner, the secretary at the company during that time. It was when GlasPly was opening a plant in La Conner, WA.

    As I said below: If you could also ask if any has any brochures, pictures, stories, whatever, that they could copy and share with me, it would be appreciated.

    Thanks again,
    Katherine Alderman


    So if anyone has brocures they would share with her she would appreciate it. Thanks guys.
    -- Tim Taylor

    1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
    1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
    1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


    The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

    Comment


    • #3
      hoopster
      02-08-2013, 01:25 AM
      Interesting Pacific Mariner history. about 10 years ago I bought a 1962 18' Pacific Mariner "Machete" from the estate of the original owner, it had a 1962 Mercury 100hp "Tower of Power" on it which was the first year for the 100hp motor, I did not care for the trolling abilities of the massive 2 stroke and traded the boat a couple years later. However the daughters commented fondly of their water skiing memories with the boat. The boat had sat exposed for a few years prior to my purchase and after a solid weekend of waxing and cleaning it's aqua blue gel coat looked great and not a soft spot to be found. If the Pacific Mariner was the ski boat for the worlds fair they likely used boats like mine, I think by '62 the "stiletto" models had lost their 1950's fins.

      I always knew there was a reason that felt like a quality boat, this is great history.
      -- Tim Taylor

      1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
      1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
      1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


      The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

      Comment


      • #4
        Bill V
        02-08-2013, 06:51 AM
        This email I received a few days ago from Katherine Alderman:

        Hi again, Bill.

        I just saw the last post you shared from me on the website. I know that the site is for GlasPly owners, but Dad's history in the boating industry took him to many companies. Want you to share this picture from the Marysville Globe in the early 60's, I believe. I am trying to go through archives to find the date but will take awhile, I'm afraid. It verifies that he did make the first Bayliners for Orin and gives the names of the staff who worked with him. One of the employees sent it to me, which I really appreciate.

        Many thanks.

        Katherine Alderman

        I have the PDF attachment and it does show a Glasply boat with a late 50's outboard and appears the brochure came from the late 50's.
        -- Tim Taylor

        1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
        1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
        1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


        The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

        Comment


        • #5
          Binford
          02-11-2013, 08:49 AM
          The PDF is too large to upload, apparently. So I took some screen shots of them to get them up quickly as we figure out how to upload the PDFs....



          -- Tim Taylor

          1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
          1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
          1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


          The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

          Comment


          • #6
            Binford
            02-11-2013, 08:54 AM
            And the other one:



            -- Tim Taylor

            1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
            1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
            1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


            The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

            Comment


            • #7
              montejw360
              07-14-2013, 06:42 PM
              a little addition to the history of "GlasPly", I'm pretty sure that my step-father started the original GlasPly company, doing laundry tubs and other stuff, but I don't know how long he did this. I don't remember who he dealt with, but if I remember correctly he "sold" the name/company to whomever started building the boats. I always remember old laundry tubs and molds laying about in the barn when growing up, and other GlasPly stuff. I didn't know it was in the 50's, but that makes sense.

              monte




              Socal
              07-14-2013, 07:41 PM
              Monte,
              That's really interesting. Any more information you can get from relatives would be great to share on the forum. Were our boats decended from molded laundry tubs???
              A lady posted a few months ago about her father, Ken Smith, founding GlasPly. What was your stepfather's name, maybe we can get a connection.




              brolor
              07-29-2013, 05:07 PM
              There is a nice full page article in the Everett Herald today about the origins of Glas-Ply boats

              http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20130729/BIZ/707299996




              Socal
              07-29-2013, 06:09 PM
              brolor, Thanks for posting the GP article. I corresponded with Ms. Alderman regarding the history of the company. We are hoping she can join us at the Anacortes rendezvous. Next post is a copy of the article.




              Bill V
              07-30-2013, 07:48 AM
              Katherine and I have been emailing for sometime now and I have encouraged her to complete the "history" of Glasply and help all of us to know the beginnings and recognize the original founder, her father. I have no doubt that her Dad was the founder after having read the articles she's sent me and she will offer a handout at the rendezvous for all to read. She and her husband have graciously accepted the invitation to attend our rendezvous and will be aboard our boat for a cruise around the area. I think I can safely speak that all GP'ers will show her the same respect that we would have shown her father if he could have attended our rendezvous. Having been to rendezvous' that previous owners Ken Hopen and Jerry Caldwell attended, I am happy to also include the daughter of the 1st owner of Glasply in my memories. Owning a Glasply has been a wonderful experience only made greater by the many fine people we have met at the rendezvous' and the stories we hear from past, present and future owners of these great boats.
              -- Tim Taylor

              1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
              1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
              1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


              The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

              Comment


              • #8
                The abovementioned Everett Herald article:


                Published: Monday, July 29, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

                The origins of Glas-Ply boats
                The founder's daughter tells his long-overlooked story



                A 1971 snapshot of a hard-top Glas-Ply boat at the factory in Marysville.
                Courtesy Katherine Smith Alderman



                Ken Smith and an employee in one of the early Glas-Ply car-top boats.
                Courtesy Katherine Smith Alderman



                From a promotional brochure for the Pacific Mariner Dagger 14.
                Courtesy Katherine Smith Alderman



                An artist's depiction of the water-ski show at the 1962 Seattle World's Fair. The boats used were Pacific Marinerfiberglass models engineered by Ken Smith.
                Courtesy Katherine Smith Alderman



                Ken Smith, founder of Glas-Ply.
                Courtesy Katherine Smith Alderman


                By Katherine Smith Alderman, Special to The Herald

                Editor's note: On Jan. 21, Herald columnist Juergen Kneifel wrote of the passing of his friend Ken Hopen, who many times has been identified as the founder of Glas-Ply boats. Hopen became a partner in the venture and eventually owned the company outright, but the actual founder was Ken Smith. Our January story prompted Smith's daughter to go to work documenting the company's early history. The Herald has examined her evidence, and we believe this is the true story of the origins of the legendary fiberglass boats built in Marysville.

                MARYSVILLE -- I read an article in The Herald in January about Glas-Ply, a Northwest icon in fiberglass boats. Glas-Ply was founded by my late father, Ken Smith, but the article failed to even mention him. This stunned and saddened me, and it launched me on a journey to document my father's business history and to set the record straight.

                Ken Smith was born in Grand Junction, Colo., in 1928. He joined the Navy at the end of World War II and was stationed in Bremerton, aboard the Lexington. After meeting my mother on a blind date and marrying her in 1946, they made Marysville their home. A daughter and son soon completed the family.

                Fiberglass fascination
                Smith held various jobs after the Navy. Among other things, he was a salesman at JC Penney and worked at Weiser's mill in Marysville. He also worked at Dean Nichols, a car body repair shop. During this time, the use of fiberglass for the restoration of Corvettes grabbed Smith's interest. His fascination with fiberglass set him on a course that propelled him into the boat-building industry. He would eventually set standards for quality, durability and design.

                Smith founded Glas-Ply Industries in the mid-1950s in a rented building on old Highway 99. He started by manufacturing fiberglass laundry tubs, which were sold at Pay 'n Pak, Thurmond's plumbing supply and Sears in Everett. He also made chairs, tables, buoys and fish tanks. He repaired fiberglass car parts and made cabin tops for Reinell boats, when the hulls were still made of wood. Smith employed one of his friends, Milo Jensen, and a couple of recent Marysville High School graduates to cut the glass, do the lamination and spray molds to apply color.

                One of the graduates, Larry Forsman, remembers bringing in a friend, Glen Carlson. They were paid a dollar an hour! He said that Smith was a good boss and recalled a bit of advice from him: "Make sure you don't wear any rings when working." That stemmed from an accident in high school, when Smith lost part of his right ring finger in a mishap at school.

                The first boats
                In 1956, the Marysville Globe ran a photo and caption announcing the expansion of Glas-Ply to a new building. There Smith produced his first boats. They were light enough to carry on the top of a car, enabling recreational fisherman to enjoy their sport anywhere a car could go. There were eight-, 10- and 12-foot models, all with V-shaped hulls. The boats, which weighed from 90 to 150 pounds, proved popular.

                The business grew rapidly, and so did Smith's reputation for building a quality product. When Pacific Marine Supply of Seattle decided to manufacture its own line of pleasure craft, they asked a rep from Rycol Chemical, a distributor of plastic resin, who would be a good choice to oversee the project. He told them, "Ken Smith."


                .....continued in the next post.
                -- Tim Taylor

                1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
                1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
                1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


                The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Continued from previous post....


                  A deal with Pacific Marine
                  In 1958, Robert Ladd, then vice president of Pacific Marine Supply, approached Smith about purchasing the boat portion of Smith's enterprise and wanted him to stay on to manage the plant -- and develop larger models, too. The deal was announced in Pacific Marine's holiday newsletter. Ladd rebranded the boats Pacific Mariner. More than 1,000 boats a year rolled off the line in Marysille. The name Glas-Ply and the laundry-tub molds were sold to a third party who wanted to continue manufacturing the tubs.

                  Don Aaland, manager of boat and trailer sales for Pacific Marine during this time, told me that in the early going a marine architect was hired to design the boats. But Smith made the wooden "plugs" from which the molds were made.

                  Testing was done on Lake Goodwin or on Ebey Slough. The sea trials helped Smith make adjustments to the design so the boats handled better. Later, he would do the design work, as well.

                  Aaland recalls a day at the slough when they needed to know if a boat could make a hard turn. Ken throttled up and turned sharply, not anticipating that the wake would slam the boat into a log boom and stall the engine. "Well, we made it," Smith said with a laugh as he re-started it. But the craft wouldn't move! The boat and the men survived, but it took quite a while to dislodge the propeller from a log and paddle back to Geddes Marina.

                  I remember a time when two naval engineers came to our home and presented a new design to my dad. He looked over the plans for a few minutes, then said, "Fellas, this is a beautiful boat, but how are you going to get it out of the mold?" Dad proceeded to mark up the blueprints, simplifying the pattern.

                  At the World's Fair
                  In 1962, the Seattle World's Fair opened. Through the efforts of Ladd and others, Tommy Bartlett's Water Ski Show was hired to perform in a giant moat erected in Memorial Stadium. More than 20 skiers were towed behind two 18-foot, stock-model Pacific Mariner boats. Smith had redesigned them so that the throttle controls, steering wheel and the helmsman's seat were centered in the boat for balance, according to an article in a 1962 issue of American Yachtsman.
                  Aaland told me that he, a Pacific Mariner exec named Art Bauer and Smith -- over lunch -- designed the 14-foot Dagger model used by the jumpers. The craft, however, was unstable in landings. So Smith devised a solution: reinforce the bottom of the boat, remove the keel and add two three-inch parallel oak runners. That did the trick.

                  The water-skiing troupe gave Smith an engraved silver box to thank him for his help.

                  The owner of Pacific Marine Supply, Ed Cunningham, died in 1960, and the company was placed in a trust managed by the Bank of California. A few years later, Smith designed a 21-foot cabin cruiser, but the Marysville building couldn't accommodate the new model, and there wasn't enough land on which to expand. The bankers thought investing in a new location and structure was too risky and wouldn't back expansion. Smith's tenure at Pacific Mariner ended, and the company was eventually sold. Smith wanted his molds and had to buy them back.

                  Around 1966-67, Orin Edson of Advanced Outboard Motors had purchased the Bayliner name and was looking for someone to build boats for him. Smith signed on to make fiberglass boats for two years. Once again, Smith was designing boats and making molds. The boats were sold at Advanced Outboard stores and Cortz Battery in Arlington, among other places. Realizing the profitability of Edson's venture, Smith decided to set out on his own. At the end of the contract, he re-acquired the Glas-Ply name and again began manufacturing his own boats.

                  Smith eventually built a new shop for the Glas-Ply production line, in the Smokey Point area. He started with a 16-footer and eventually added a 17-foot hard-top model with an inboard or outboard motor. Later came 19-, 21- and 28-footers.

                  Names behind the brand
                  The business prospered because of his attention to good design, materials -- and employees. Dad mentored many men throughout his boat-building career. Others went on to Bayliner and other companies in the area. Among those that I remember: Ted Pederson, Glen and Dick Carlson, the three McKay brothers, Adrian Vandenbosch, Frank Stone, Don Thompson, Jack Parker, Bob and Dennis Dahlberg, Ralph Nelson, Ralph Rhode, Bob Anderson and Ron Thomas. Their skills were valued in the fiberglass industry.

                  Running the production line, designing boats, managing the office and selling vessels was too much work for one person. Smith needed help, and in 1967 he contacted a former Pacific Marine Supply salesman by the name of Ken Hopen. Hopen worked for Chrysler Outboard Motors. He accepted a position with Glas-Ply to establish dealerships and solicit sales. He proved to be an excellent promoter, and a few years later Hopen was made an equal partner in Glas-Ply.
                  During this time, many government agencies awarded Glas-Ply contracts for work boats, including the state of Washington, the city of Seattle, the state of Alaska and the U.S. Department of the Interior.

                  Office manager Jane Wagner was hired in 1969 and promoted to vice president when Glas-Ply was incorporated around 1970. Smith and Hopen shared the presidency.

                  Jane wrote me, "Ken Smith was a very intense, artistic, hardworking person. When things were running smoothly he was bored." He liked to brainstorm. "It was like his job was done and he couldn't sit around and do nothing."

                  Smith sells to Hopen
                  Smith sold his interest in Glas-Ply to partner Hopen around 1971 or 1972 and moved to Kawela, Hawaii, and began building boats there under the name Glas-Pro. Producing boats in Hawaii proved to be too expensive, though, and Smith returned to the mainland.

                  From 1975 to 1993, Smith lived in Kansas City, Mo., Pagosa Springs, Colo., and Vernal, Utah. He started a small gem shop in Kansas City and built houses.

                  Ken Smith was a dreamer and a gifted man. He said boat designs came to him while he was asleep. He'd awaken with a vivid idea and hurry to sketch it out. He was also able to size up a problem and come up with an innovative solution. To the end, he kept devising businesses. Could thermal energy be used to heat homes? Why not bury people upright to save space? Shocking, perhaps, but practical!

                  His most prized accomplishment, however, was building boats that still ply Northwest waters. Those who own or have owned an early Glas-Ply or Pacific Mariner craft know they were well-made, well-designed products. The names live on in the boating world.

                  Ken Smith died May 30, 2010, at 82. I am proud to have called him Dad.

                  Katherine Smith Alderman is the daughter of Glas-Ply founder Ken Smith. She is a former Miss Marysville and still lives there. She would love to hear from people who worked at Glas-Ply via email at kalderman5243 at hotmail dot com.

                  Glas-Ply boats rendezvous
                  Glas-Ply boating enthusiasts will meet Aug. 9-11 [2013] at the Cap Sante Marina in Anacortes for their yearly Rendezvous. For more information, go to GlasPly.net.
                  -- Tim Taylor

                  1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
                  1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
                  1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


                  The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The January 2014 issue of Northwest Yachting has an article by Katherine Smith Alderman whose father, Ken Smith founded Glas-Ply. Those of us who attended the 2013 Cap Sante Rendezous had the pleasure of meeting Katherine and her husband. She is researching a book on GlasPly and if you can provide any information to assist her it would be greatly appreciated.
                    Article found at: www.nwyachting.com Article begins on page 62
                    Contact Katherine: kalderman5243@hotmail.com

                    It may be hard to accept but it is now public knowledge that our boats decended from laundry tubs! Who knew? I still like mine, number four since the 1973 21 Express purchased in the late 70's. Interesting sidelight in the history is that Don Aaland was mentioned as an employee of Pacific Mariner. He was at Jacobsen's Marine in Ballard and sold me my 2580 in 1980.
                    The cruise liner QE2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel fuel that it burns.

                    1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      According to that, Bill V is one of the founders of Glas-Ply!
                      -- Tim Taylor

                      1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
                      1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
                      1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


                      The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Building laundry tubs was how BillV learned his fiberglas skills.
                        The cruise liner QE2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel fuel that it burns.

                        1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Socal View Post
                          The January 2014 issue of Northwest Yachting has an article by Katherine Smith Alderman whose father, Ken Smith founded Glas-Ply. Those of us who attended the 2013 Cap Sante Rendezous had the pleasure of meeting Katherine and her husband. She is researching a book on GlasPly and if you can provide any information to assist her it would be greatly appreciated.
                          Article found at: www.nwyachting.com Article begins on page 62
                          Contact Katherine: kalderman5243@hotmail.com

                          It may be hard to accept but it is now public knowledge that our boats decended from laundry tubs! Who knew? I still like mine, number four since the 1973 21 Express purchased in the late 70's. Interesting sidelight in the history is that Don Aaland was mentioned as an employee of Pacific Mariner. He was at Jacobsen's Marine in Ballard and sold me my 2580 in 1980.
                          Excellent post, thanks for sharing that link....!
                          1982 2580 "HI-BOY " IN 2 DEEP 5.7LX ALPHA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I visited Bill V recently, he gave me the extra set of keys for JV Junior. On it was a keychain float with the name of the boat dealer the original owner got the boat from new back in 1982. The keychain reads:

                            SANDE BOATS
                            & MOTORS
                            P.O. Box 317, Belfair, WA
                            Glasply Boats
                            & Mercury Motors
                            (206) 275-2846


                            So I looked online and found some history about Sande Boats. Seems they used to build a 13-foot wooden boat called the Sande Ace that was supposedly really popular down around here and on Hood Canal. That was back in the 50s. Once fiberglass boats came into demand, they quit building them and instead became a dealer for Glasply.

                            Here's a Mercury ad from 1975, I believe, featuring Sande Boats, that has a picture of a Glasply in it:




                            And yes, sure enough, JV Junior came equipped with a Mercury outboard! Originally sold just 10 minutes from my place!
                            -- Tim Taylor

                            1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
                            1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
                            1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


                            The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Sande Ace owner's group is a smaller version of the GP Forum. Their boats are wood and restored for show. Good to learn one of the founders was an Army Engineer. I remember those boats from my early days on South Puget Sound. Their website also mentions Lady Clipper boats which were popular in the day. The Siglers began the Lady Clipper line in Tacoma and had a store and shop in Olympia for a time.
                              The cruise liner QE2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel fuel that it burns.

                              1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

                              Comment

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