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1976 23ft restoration

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  • 1976 23ft restoration

    so I have just barely started into this project but am already finding all kinds of interesting things. first is that this vessel has four saddle tanks two midship and two aft. all appear to be about 20gal. with no tank in the floor just a wide open bilge space with a removable floor section. as well it appears that either someone has had the floor up before me and fiberglassed the stringers then or they were done at the factory? appears to be wood underneath the glass. is there any reason they didn't make the storage compartment under the cuddy drain into the bilge area?

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  • #2
    They usually have small (<1/2") drain holes near a corner of the compartments which drain to the bilge and flow below the central-mounted fuel tank to the transom. Does yours not have those holes in the cuddy?
    -- Tim Taylor

    1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
    1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
    1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


    I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

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    • #3
      no it didn't they were full of water and completely rotten. seemed crazy that they wouldn't simply drain to the bilge.

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      • #4
        Probably no reason to have drain holes since under normal circumstances they should never get water in them.

        It wouldnt hurt to add some.
        1981 Hardtop Cuddy Alaskan Bulkhead Rebuild Thread
        1972 HT Cuddy-Rebuild Thread
        8' 650cc Kawasaki powered dinghy

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        • #5
          wondering if I should put foam under the floor? what are the advantages and disadvantages?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by karsten View Post
            wondering if I should put foam under the floor? what are the advantages and disadvantages?
            Foam..... IMO is a bad idea, just like replacing wood stringers, there have been countless hours scraping wet foam out of boats under 20', aluminum or fiberglass, closed cell, open cell it eventually becomes sponge, and gets heavy.
            1982 2580 "HI-BOY " IN 2 DEEP 5.7LX ALPHA

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            • #7
              I used to worry about water-logged foam too, until I pulled the floor out of Chopstick II. Yeah, the foam was soaked, but it didn't permeate the cells. Just in between them. That's why I drilled a hole in the sole of Chopstick and put a deck plate over it so I can check for, and vacuum out, any accumulated water (of which there's been none).

              The foam will displace any water that could get in there, mostly, and provide flotation enough that the boat won't sink to the bottom of the sea. You'll be able to sit on top of the swamped vessel possibly saving your life. Doesn't get to that point very often though, so....

              That all said, I'm not sure I'd put foam back in or not, were it me.
              -- Tim Taylor

              1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
              1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
              1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout, project boat (Beer Goggles)


              I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

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              • #8
                I would only like the noise reduction the foam offers

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                • #9
                  So I have torn more of the deck out and it is really quite interesting. The port side has fiberglassed over wood stringers that are completely rotted. The starboard side has bare wood stringers that appear in rather decent shape. Makes me wonder when the work was done? Also on the gunnels is it necessary to have the vertical ribs? This boat has several as it had four 18 gallon saddle tanks. Also anyone have any interest in a couple Volvo aq130's and 280 outdrives?
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                  Last edited by nova7163; 06-25-2017, 09:15 PM.

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                  • #10
                    so its been a while, but have just gotten the old Volvos out of the boat and the outdrives separated from the transom what are everyones thoughts on how to best enclose the transom for an outboard bracket? going to dig into the transom further but at first glance it appears to be in pretty decent shape for the age of the boat.

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                    • #11
                      Karsten
                      Decide what kind and how much power you want. Then you will have some weight calculations to work with. Research some bracket builders and get their input on transom building. Several threads on the site for that type of project. That will be a lot of weight and torque on the hull so you will need a strong transom tied into stringers through knees tied into the stringers.
                      The cruise liner QE2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel fuel that it burns.

                      1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

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                      • #12
                        A friend of mine, Sailorman, on the forum here has the same boat as you. He's been through several steps and changes converting his boat from dual 4cyl Volvo power to his current 250 Honda 4 stroke power configuration. I will reach out to him and see if he can get in touch with you and share his trials and triumphs. He doesn't post much on the forum.
                        I stayed up all night to see where the sun went. Then it dawned on me....

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                        • #13
                          thanks kf7gth I would love to talk with sailorman as he has done what I am looking to do, not to mention I am fairly close to the both of you I think being in Arlington. I am really open to all the information I can gather as I only want to do this once. thanks a bunch.

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                          • #14
                            Looking for some experience here. So I have all of the wood out of the bottom of this boat and am preparing to start rebuilding. My question is this how much of the old resin do I need to grind out? It seems this boat may have stringers replaced in the past and they were a little sloppy with the resin as there is an awful lot of it in the bottom of this boat. Do I need to grind it all away or just enough to have a nice reasonably flat surface to bond to? Thanks for the help

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                            • #15
                              In my opinion, how much old resin you grind away depends on what you are trying to bond-like weather it's structural or not, etc. The more old resin and glass you grind off, the better the bond will be. I just enclosed/reinforced/bracketed my 21 foot Glasply this year. You are welcome to check it out if you want...located in Lynnwood. 360-340-0143 Nik

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