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New railing - 304 or 316 stainless

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  • New railing - 304 or 316 stainless

    I'm adding railing to the stern and rear gunwale sections of my 23.

    I have spec'd out 316 for stanchions and fasteners, but the railing remains in question. The price difference between 304 and 316 tubing is significant. Someone recommended 316 fittings/fasteners and 304 rail. Anyone have experience with 304/316 in this application?

    Gordo is the rack on your 23 304 or 316?
    1978 17' Runabout - AQ120B/270
    1978 23' Cuddy

  • #2
    I'm curious to know myself.
    1978 Glasply 21ft 5.7l Mercruiser R drive "Sandi's Surprise"
    1981 Glasply 17ft 70hp Johnson & 9.8hp Nissan kicker "Skunked"

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    • #3
      A good read to help you decide. http://www.reliance-foundry.com/blog...ess-steel#gref In the long run it will depend how you use and store your boat. If high and dry most the time then 304 should work. If kept wet in the salt then 316 is your best bet unless you want to do this more then once. Post pictures as you go, this is great addition to the boat!

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      • #4
        When I had PDR Marine build my cockpit railings he used all 316 SS because as hand railings are exposed to weather and salt it is the preferred material. None of the handrails that came on Sea Sports, Ranger Tugs, Cutwaters or Ocean Sports have 304, all use 316 because PDR builds them that way because the manufactures require it.
        Last edited by Bill V; 01-16-2018, 12:01 AM.
        "Joint Venture" 1978 28' twin 2017 Vortec roller cam 383/6.3L 350hp engines - You name it, I've either replaced it, restored it, rebuilt it or repaired it. That's my job now that I'm retired.

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        • #5
          JJC and Bill are correct. 316 contains 2% molybdenum which is added to resist corrosion to salt water chlorides. Apparently 304 does not have the molybdenum component.
          The cruise liner QE2 moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel fuel that it burns.

          1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jjc23 View Post
            A good read to help you decide. http://www.reliance-foundry.com/blog...ess-steel#gref In the long run it will depend how you use and store your boat. If high and dry most the time then 304 should work. If kept wet in the salt then 316 is your best bet unless you want to do this more then once. Post pictures as you go, this is great addition to the boat!
            Thanks. I had read that article. The boat is not moored and will only see the salt about 10 times a year. Nonetheless, I agree will you and Bill, 316 is the best. I need to remove the existing rod holder mounts and glass over the holes before installing rail. I'll post when completed.

            Thanks fellas
            1978 17' Runabout - AQ120B/270
            1978 23' Cuddy

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            • #7
              I've been meaning to post these. It is a great addition to the boat as jjc said. Took a bit of research to find polished 316 tube at a decent price.

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              Attached Files
              1978 17' Runabout - AQ120B/270
              1978 23' Cuddy

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              • #8
                Very nice!!

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                • #9
                  looks good!
                  1980 2400 Cuddy I/O, 2017 Cummins 4BT coupled to a Volvo DP-SM with F9 Props, and a 2014 Mercury 15HP Pro-Kicker "LOOSE CHANGE"

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                  • #10
                    7/8" diameter right? Where did you find it.
                    1981 Hardtop Cuddy Alaskan Bulkhead Rebuild Thread
                    1972 HT Cuddy-Rebuild Thread
                    8' 650cc Kawasaki powered dinghy

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                    • #11
                      Yes. I wanted 1", but couldn't find it. Wall diameter is .065 I believe. Found it at a local metal supplier - one I stopped using years ago because of their pricing, but they came in lower than everyone and they found polished - go figure.. Had to buy a 20' stick. Fittings are Suncor, purchased online from Defender. They are 316 also.
                      1978 17' Runabout - AQ120B/270
                      1978 23' Cuddy

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nova7163 View Post
                        7/8" diameter right? Where did you find it.
                        Dwayne at PDR said his not doing railings anymore but when I picked the boat up last week he hinted that he still would. he had a ton in his office and it looked nice. I believe he did Bills??

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gordo View Post
                          Dwayne at PDR said his not doing railings anymore but when I picked the boat up last week he hinted that he still would. he had a ton in his office and it looked nice. I believe he did Bills??
                          Yes, he did my cockpit rails and they are 6" higher then the OEM's. Nice workmanship and an improvement I really like.
                          "Joint Venture" 1978 28' twin 2017 Vortec roller cam 383/6.3L 350hp engines - You name it, I've either replaced it, restored it, rebuilt it or repaired it. That's my job now that I'm retired.

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