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Thread: Where do I plug in Gas Hose? 1974 Glasply, Mercruiser 165

  1. #1

    Where do I plug in Gas Hose? 1974 Glasply, Mercruiser 165

    Could someone help me find out where I connect the gas can to the boat motor on this Mercruiser 165 Glasply...

    Im not much of a boat or motor guy and this was my uncle's boat. From what i've seen on other boat engines on youtube the gas goes into the part of the engine i've marked on the diagram (on the right)... but that hose is redirected up towards the back of the boat. Is there a tank that i'm unaware of? Or am I supposed to plug the red can in somewhere? I'll link the image below so you can see what i'm talking about the green lines indicate the hose that i'm talking about... Hopefully this makes sense.

    Thanks!

    http://i63.tinypic.com/29mk39t.jpg


  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    What you are seeing on the inside of the transom(back of boat) is a fuel filter/water separator. The fuel line on the out board side of that filter is coming from the fuel tank. Does that answer your question?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by 18ftTrophy View Post
    What you are seeing on the inside of the transom(back of boat) is a fuel filter/water separator. The fuel line on the out board side of that filter is coming from the fuel tank. Does that answer your question?
    Yes, awesome, thank you... was wondering what that is. So where do I pump the gas into this thing? I've only had smaller boats before and so I always had a red gas tank... so I thought the gas tank in the boat must be for this... is there an inboard gas tank? Where do I fill it up?

  4. #4
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    Should be on the outside of the transom a little left of center near t he top.

  5. #5
    Administrator Binford's Avatar
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    The gas fill will likely be a chrome screw cap either on the transom (back of the boat, probably slightly left of center) or on the side (likely the left side). Just regular gasoline will be what it takes.

    The main tank is going to be under the sole (floor) at the centerline. There will be a panel about 20” wide or so and maybe 5 or 6 feet long. Probably about 50 gallon capacity. There will also be a breather on the left side of the boat, a little forward of center. It will be a 1/2-inch or so chrome cap with a couple vent holes on it. As you fill the tank, you will hear air rush out of that vent. Sometimes when topping off fuel may burp out of it too, so be ready for cleanup if that happens.



    In looking again at your pictures, I don’t see the fuel filler hose on the left side of the engine so probably your filler cap will be on the left side of the boat, rather than on the back.
    -- Tim Taylor

    1979 Glasply 21-foot I/O Overnighter w/ 5.0L Volvo-Penta duoprop (Cardinal)
    1980 Glasply 19-1/2 foot hardtop cuddy w/ a fresh Mercruiser 470 (formerly Chopstick) SOLD!
    1980 Glasply 19-1/2 foot hardtop cuddy, soon to be with kf7gth (Chopstick II)
    1982 Glasply 16-foot runabout w/ 50hp Mercury OB (JV Junior)
    1986 Glasply 8-1/2 foot dinghy (presently unpowered & unnamed) SOLD!
    1978 Glasply 19-1/2 foot runabout w/ Mercruiser 470 (Beer Goggles)


    The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

  6. #6
    Moderator Socal's Avatar
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    MikeC
    Welcome to the Forum. Lots of knowledge here about GP’s. Before you get too far into the fuel system, find someone who can help you identify the parts of the system and which lines go together. Gasoline is explosive and you don’t want a fire on a Fiberglas boat.
    The boat has a built in tank under the floor with an external fill hose through the deck as said earlier. Fuel gets to the engine from the tank which goes through the fuel pump, fuel filter and into the carburetor. Older boats on trailers are prone to fuel tank leaks from water condensation. Fuel lines harden and standing fuel can become contaminated with varnish. Welcome to the world of boating!
    Keep us posted on your progress.
    Last edited by Socal; 07-25-2018 at 09:48 PM.
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    1982 28' Long Cabin "Molly Brown" sweating through a long hot summer. Massive California forest fires fill our sky with smoke. SUP paddlers and kayakers transit the harbor with abandon, thinking they have the right of way over all boats.

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